Projects

Year of Code

I set a goal for myself at the beginning of 2014 to contribute to an open source project I didn’t start, and get my contribution accepted by the developers. As the year went on, I cataloged it in a special section of my blog. Now that the year is over, I’m moving it to a regular post. I’m pretty sure that this is not up to date, since I’ve barely touched my blog in about a year. For example I know I contributed to the Selenium project, and I think that was still in 2014, but it’s not listed anywhere here. At any rate, aside from this paragraph, I moved the thing whole sale from its own page into a regular blog entry.

Continue reading

Gear

Go Bag July 2014

Pretty much immediately after posting in March, I started swapping bags fairly frequently; between my Powerbag, a backpack, and eventually to my original Timbuk2 Commute. Because of that, I ended up pairing down a lot. It was too much of a pain in the butt to move everything I had been carrying.

Continue reading

tech

Setting Up a VPN Connection on Linux Mint 16

I worked from home yesterday for the first time since getting Linux Mint 16 installed on my new laptop. That meant I spent all of yesterday morning figuring out how to get the VPN connection to my office working. I ended up having multiple problems throughout the process, and none of the guides I found were definitive or included all the steps required for resolving the entire issue. I’m recording this for posterity, in hopes that people will be able to find it and won’t have to dig through multiple sources just to get stuck on the next issue down the chain.

Continue reading

tech

Advanced Internetting: Password Managers

Image via datenform.de

Did you know that your LinkedIn password is on display in a German Museum? Is your password “123456?” How’d I guess?  Well, it’s the most common password in use today. Scary isn’t it? Here’s something truly terrifying: for 20 years, the US secret nuclear launch code was “00000000.” Even if you aren’t launching nukes, your passwords are important. Why are they important? Unless you want someone you don’t know to have access to your Facebook, Gmail, and Twitter accounts, you need to care about your passwords.

Continue reading

Projects

Raspberry Pi Mail Server: Final Touches

Updates: It turns out the relayhost setting below didn’t work for me. Here’s what I did instead.

If you’ve read any of my prvious posts about this (previous posts listed here), you’ll know they pretty much all included a “Next Steps” section. I have finally finished everything on the lists, so unless I discover I’ve done something wrong, or I think of something else this needs, I should be done with this project. Here’s what was left, which I’ll cover in this post:

Projects

Static Serving this Blog with Hyde

Last week, I converted my blog from WordPress to Hyde.

Blogs are fairly straight-forward bits of software. Because of this, and the fact that everyone and their mother has a blog, building a blogging platform has become a sort of Hello World for showing off new programming languages or frameworks. Static site generators are starting to become more popular, too, because Amazon has made serving static content stupid-cheap with S3. The first big time static blog generator was Jekyll (at least that I’m aware of), which is built using Ruby on Rails. Not to be outdone, someone in the Python community made Hyde.

Continue reading